Dick Spight Farallon Islands Foundation Intern – 2018

In 2018, FIF funded a seasonal intern who was trained by Point Blue staff and resided on the Farallon Islands from March 17 through August 18, 2018 conducting seabird monitoring research. Monitoring activities included breeding success censuses, and banding and identification of seabirds and other wildlife. The intern also received hands-on experience with database management, science writing, experimental design and … Read More

Video and Interactive Map of Farallon National Wildlife Refuge – 2015

Farallon Islands Video, 2015

The Farallon National Wildlife Refuge provides a home for seals, sea lions, the largest seabird breeding colony in the United States (over 300,000 seabirds and 13 species), and many other species. It is one of only three refuges in the United States that are closed to the public, however, teams of biologists from Point Blue Conservation Science (formerly Point Reyes … Read More

Supporting the study of Tufted Puffins, Cassin’s Auklets and Common Murres on the Farallon Islands – 2013

Tufted Puffin

FIF has supported research conducted on wildlife populations by Point Reyes Bird Observatory (PRBO) since the foundation’s inception in 1999. One of our earliest projects assisted PRBO research by funding, building, and transporting nesting boxes for auklets on North Farallon. Our 2013 grant to PRBO was designed to further the group’s research efforts for the Farallons’ Common Murre, Tufted Puffin and … Read More

Gray Water Tank on Farallon Island – 2000

Gray water tank, Farallon Islands

Point Reyes Bird Observatory and the US Fish and Wildlife Service aim to have the buildings on the Farallon Islands as self sufficient as possible. There are two buildings in use; one houses the resident scientists, and the other is used for office and laboratory space. Because there is no fresh water on the island, drinking water was shipped from … Read More

GPS System – 2000

GPS System

The Farallon Islands Foundation made a grant to the Point Reyes Bird Observatory (PRBO) to purchase a Global Positioning System (GPS) and training in their use for four PRBO researchers. The GPS will be used on the Farallon and Año Nuevo Islands. This system, which is accurate to within 1 meter, increased accuracy in the mapping of nest locations, shark … Read More

Scrap and Trash Cleanup on Southeast Farallon Island – 2000

Volunteers at work at cleanup on Farallon Islands (2000)

Increasingly, the Foundation gets involved in projects that involve more than one organization and sometimes several, such as removal of the scrap and trash from the SE Farallon Island. Many people contributed to the accumulation of debris over the years, including egg gatherers, the US Coast Guard, light house keepers and others. But wind, salt, waves and metal erosion soon … Read More

Nesting Boxes for Auklets on the Farallon Islands – 2000

An avian condo

The Cassin’s Auklet is a burrow and crevice-nesting seabird of the Pacific Coast. With a declining population and nesting range, it is a candidate for California’s Species of Special Concern list. About 80% of California’s Cassin’s Auklets breed on the Farallon Islands. Mated pairs lay only one egg per year. Point Reyes Bird Observatory (now Point Blue) has studied breeding … Read More

Dual Pane Window Retrofit – 1999

Point Reyes Bird Observatory and the US Fish and Wildlife Service aim to have the buildings on the Farallon Islands as self sufficient as possible. There are two buildings in use; one houses the resident scientists, and the other is used as office and laboratory space. Both are old and, prior to these improvements, not energy-efficient. FIF made a grant … Read More

Farallon Islands Boardwalk Replacement – 1999

Boardwalk replacement on the Farallon Islands, 2000.

  The Farallon Islands National Wildlife Refuge boardwalk project was developed to protect burrow-nesting seabirds (Cassin’s and Rhinoceros Auklets, in particular). These birds, as well as Tufted Puffins, Pigeon Guillemots and Ashy Storm-Petrels lay their eggs and seek shelter in crevices, as well as burrows that they excavate in the soil. Burrows in the loose soil of the marine terrace … Read More